Your Lifestyle Guide

Poseidon Undersea Resort

A private island in north-eastern Fiji is set to become the Poseidon Undersea Resort in just a few short years. The first entirely underwater hotel, it will feature 23 luxury suites, a bar, a spa, and a wedding chapel. Architect Bruce Jones has announced that the price per week will be around 30,000 USD.

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If you believe in the mythology of Poseidon or his Roman alter-ego Neptune, the lord of the sea lives deep underwater in a crystal palace guarded by two giant sea horses. According to legend, the watery kind only ever left his Atlantic Ocean residence for two reasons: to visit his brother Zeus on Mount Olympus, or to start some war or other. We’ve got a third, similar reason though: a quick vacation at an underwater palace in the Fiji Islands.

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Poseidon’s palace

The first inklings of the project began in 2001 as engineer L. Bruce Jones began to envision a permanent underwater luxury hotel offering discerning guests every imaginable treat. Due to the financial crisis, the hotel was put on hold until 2009, when work on the extensive technological requirements began again.

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Now however, the project has progressed far enough that US Submarine Structures has chosen a 0.91 square kilometer private island in northeastern Fiji as a starting point. Within the island’s ocean-sheltered boundaries, a total of 23 luxury suites and one double-sized king suite will be built. Additionally, the complex will include a bar, a library, a conference room, a spa area, and even a wedding chapel.

With the thought of spending several nights underwater in a luxury hotel, there are a few safety questions that immediately come up. The pipe-shaped guest corridors are fitted with a permanent elevator shaft that provides fresh air, even without mechanical help. Each suite is an individual module that can be coupled with the above-ground world in case of trouble. 2.5-centimeter-thick steel walls and 10-centimeter acrylic windows form the outside surface of the egg-shaped capsules that can withstand more than six bar of pressure (the pressure at a depth of 12-meters). A special foil shield allows guests to look outside and prevents any curious fish from peering inside.

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